Short Reads on November 2016

Religion and Politics

The Disarray and Hope of Our Post-Election Abortion Politics

Pro-lifers, despite being in the clear majority of the country, are now politically homeless. 73% of Americans want abortion to be broadly illegal after week twelve of gestation, but for the US Congress, a 20-week limit—a modest threshold that makes European restrictions look pro-life—seems impossible to achieve. Senate Democrats still have the capacity to filibuster…

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Politics by Candlelight: Contemplating Political Catharsis and Illumination
Religion and Politics

Politics by Candlelight: Contemplating Political Catharsis and Illumination

“Democracy is coming to the USA.” (Leonard Cohen) Americans don’t like talking openly about politics across party lines; they prefer to talk in their own silos and not to each other. American Christians – at least, this is my experience among Orthodox Christians in America – would almost identify political argumentation as somehow betraying the…

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Ethics, Orthodoxy and Modernity

The Challenge of the Other

Orthodox in America are privileged in enjoying complete freedom of worship untethered by allegiance to the state. This is an environment that still, a few hundred years later, is experienced as somewhat of a novelty compared with our much longer history in which we were either joined to the state, or oppressed by it. We…

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New Testament Codex 1424 Returned to the Care of the Ecumenical Patriarchate
Church History, Ecumenical and Interfaith Relations

New Testament Codex 1424 Returned to the Care of the Ecumenical Patriarchate

Tuesday, November 15th, 2016 was a momentous occasion for inter-Christian relations and for the history of the New Testament (NT). An important 9th century AD Greek NT codex that had been stolen in 1917 from the Monastery of Panagia Eikosiphoinissa near Drama, Greece was officially returned to the custody of the Ecumenical Patriarchate of Constantinople…

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Public Orthodoxy seeks to promote conversation by providing a forum for diverse perspectives on contemporary issues related to Orthodox Christianity. The positions expressed in the articles on this website are solely the author’s and do not necessarily represent the views of the editors or the Orthodox Christian Studies Center.

Attribution

Public Orthodoxy is a publication of the Orthodox Christian Studies Center of Fordham University