Short Reads on February 2017

Is the Russian Orthodox Church Pushing Battered Women into Feminism?
Religion and Politics, Women in the Church

Is the Russian Orthodox Church Pushing Battered Women into Feminism?

As expected, President Putin signed the law decriminalizing family violence, shifting certain offenses from criminal to administrative proceedings. Ostensibly this was done to bring the law into compliance with changes to the criminal code that had redefined assaults that do not result in “substantial bodily harm” from criminal to administrative violations. The change was decried…

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Civicness and Orthodoxy in Romanian Protests
Religion and Politics

Civicness and Orthodoxy in Romanian Protests

In December 2016, Romania’s political landscape changed following the parliamentary elections. The Social Democratic Party (PSD, successor to the Romanian Communist Party) won a plurality of seats (around 44%) in both the upper and lower chambers of Parliament, but fell short of securing a simple majority. With the help of the Alliance of Liberals and…

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“Taking Orthodoxy to America” – Thirty Years Later
Church Life and Pastoral Care, Liturgical Life

“Taking Orthodoxy to America” – Thirty Years Later

Thirty years ago this month, Metropolitan Philip of the Antiochian Archdiocese began the process of bringing into the Orthodox Church seventeen “Evangelical Orthodox” communities from across America. At that time, he declared Orthodoxy to be “America’s best kept secret,” and he urged us as new converts to do something about this. “Take Orthodoxy to America,” he…

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“Beat Her When You Are Alone Together”
Religion and Politics

“Beat Her When You Are Alone Together” Domestic Violence in the Russian Tradition, Past and Present

On February 7, Russian President Vladimir Putin signed a law decriminalizing domestic violence. Now, the first instance of poboi—“actions which cause physical pain but do not lead to grave injury or loss of ability to work’’—will be treated as a misdemeanor rather than a criminal act. This means that the offender will incur a fine…

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Speak Up for the Trees
Ethics

Speak Up for the Trees

Melted glaciers. Bleached coral reefs. Slashed forests. Drained wetlands. Burning oil fields. Smog. – Environmental destruction all around us. Why ought Orthodox Christians advocate for flora and fauna? Why should we care when environmental protections are dismantled, polluting industries reinvigorated, ecological dangers ignored or denied? Why must we speak up for all of creation—two-legged, four-legged,…

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Pro-Life Means Pro-Social Justice
Ethics

Pro-Life Means Pro-Social Justice

I am pro-life. That means that I’m also pro-social justice. That means that I am not only for the dignity of the human being from the moment of conception, but also for the dignity of the human being until the natural end of life. For life does not end with birth. A person who is…

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Disclaimer

Public Orthodoxy seeks to promote conversation by providing a forum for diverse perspectives on contemporary issues related to Orthodox Christianity. The positions expressed in the articles on this website are solely the author’s and do not necessarily represent the views of the editors or the Orthodox Christian Studies Center.

Attribution

Public Orthodoxy is a publication of the Orthodox Christian Studies Center of Fordham University