Short Reads on August 2020

George Seferis and the Freedom of Tradition
Culture and Arts, Theology

George Seferis and the Freedom of Tradition

ελληνικά “I belong to a small country,” said the great Greek poet George Seferis in his Nobel Prize winning speech in 1963. “It is small, but its tradition is immense.” As wrangling over the word “tradition” has become an idle pastime, particularly on that domain of debauchery known as social media, Seferis’s thoughts warrant consideration,…

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Pastoral Guidance for Civic Engagement
Public Life

Pastoral Guidance for Civic Engagement Moving Towards a Social Ethos of the Orthodox Church

It should go without saying that the current COVID-19 crisis combined with challenging social issues and a contentious political environment is a time for prayerful and meaningful pastoral guidance. We have seen many of our Orthodox hierarchs, leaders, and theologians engage with the challenging issues of our time, both with sincere and substantive reflection as well…

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Rebellion at the Heart of the Bible
Religion and Politics, Theology

Rebellion at the Heart of the Bible A Theology of Rebellion

Ελληνικά In the context of contemporary events, protests, and the revolt spreading throughout Serbia, the matter can also be seen from a theological point of view. It is hard to say how well the churchgoing people are managing in all this. On the public stage, there are but a handful of voices that are perceived…

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The Belarusian Protests and the Orthodox Church
Public Life, Religion and Politics

The Belarusian Protests and the Orthodox Church

ελληνικά | ру́сский In Russia, there is a widely spread superstition that August brings national-scale catastrophes. The mass protests in Belarus against Alyaksandr Lukashenka are seen as such a catastrophe for the regime of Vladimir Putin. Even though Mr. Lukashenka struggled to preserve some independence for his country from Russia, Belarus under his rule represented the model of a…

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Who Are You When You Feel Liturgically?
Liturgical Life, Theology

Who Are You When You Feel Liturgically?

Ελληνικά What is emotion? Do emotions have a history? Who has emotion? Are emotions innate? These questions are far more complex than they might seem. Indeed, in recent years, scholars have explored how emotions were understood and enacted throughout history, investigated how emotional discourses acted as drivers of cultural and political change, and probed the…

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Disclaimer

Public Orthodoxy seeks to promote conversation by providing a forum for diverse perspectives on contemporary issues related to Orthodox Christianity. The positions expressed in the articles on this website are solely the author’s and do not necessarily represent the views of the editors or the Orthodox Christian Studies Center.

Attribution

Public Orthodoxy is a publication of the Orthodox Christian Studies Center of Fordham University