Short Reads on March 2024

In the Image and Likeness of God
Orthodoxy and Modernity

In the Image and Likeness of God Let’s Talk About Orthodoxy and Race

One morning not long ago I sat down at a table in a Midwestern university’s special collections library, eager to spend several days working through a cart packed with anniversary books and commemorative pamphlets published by Orthodox parishes and dioceses across North America. These kinds of booklets are invaluable in my work as a historian,…

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Fasting, the Food Industry, and Eucharistic Consumption
Environmental Ethics

Fasting, the Food Industry, and Eucharistic Consumption A Lenten Reflection

As Orthodox Christians prepare for Easter by partaking in fasting this Lenten season, we ought to pause to reflect on the ways in which this practice, in addition to being a source of spiritual renewal, can serve as a source of social transformation and ecological restoration. In order to ameliorate the ecological crises we currently…

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Seeing Jesus, Always Seeing Jesus
Christian Practice

Seeing Jesus, Always Seeing Jesus

When You, O God, shall come to earth with glory, / all things shall tremble / and the river of fire shall flow before Your judgment seat; / the books shall be opened and the hidden things disclosed! / Then deliver me from the unquenchable fire, / and make me worthy to stand at Your…

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Was Berdyaev’s Philosophical Humanism Inhumane?
Theology

Was Berdyaev’s Philosophical Humanism Inhumane?

In her remarkable essay on the religious-philosophical scene in the Russian Silver Age, Bernice Glatzer Rosenthal describes Berdyaev’s humanism as inhumane. The emblems of this “inhumanity” are represented, among other things, by his approval of Russia’s entry to the Great War, his praise of the Catholic Middle Ages, and his rejection of the idea of “the eternal bourgeois peace.” But is it possible that Berdyaev’s radical emphasis on the human personhood and human freedom is indeed inhumane?

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Public Orthodoxy seeks to promote conversation by providing a forum for diverse perspectives on contemporary issues related to Orthodox Christianity. The positions expressed in the articles on this website are solely the author’s and do not necessarily represent the views of the editors or the Orthodox Christian Studies Center.

Attribution

Public Orthodoxy is a publication of the Orthodox Christian Studies Center of Fordham University