Tag: Accommodationism

Are Nuclear Weapons Moral?
Ethics, Religion and Conflict

Are Nuclear Weapons Moral? In Search of Orthodox Christian Thought on Deterrence and Disarmament

I happened to be in Sweden when the country joined NATO two months ago. On March 6, an American nuclear-capable B-52 strategic bomber overflew the capital region in a show of solidarity with the newest alliance member. On the ground below, in the Stockholm suburbs, I was beginning my field work with Orthodox Christians to…

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Save Kyiv Theological Academy
Education and Academia, Religion and Politics

Save Kyiv Theological Academy

Students of Kyiv Theological Academy In 2022, the Russian Federation began full-scale military aggression against Ukraine. There are already many thousands of victims in this terrible war, not only military, but also civilians.   The Ukrainian Orthodox Church took the side of the Ukrainian people from the very beginning of the war. Already on February 24,…

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Which Orthodox Church in Ukraine is the Largest?
Inter-Orthodox Relations, Orthodoxy and Modernity

Which Orthodox Church in Ukraine is the Largest?

From the moment the Orthodox Church of Ukraine (OCU) was granted autocephaly by the Ecumenical Patriarch early in 2019, it has competed with the Ukrainian Orthodox Church (UOC) not only over canonicity but also about the number of parishes and the number of faithful. Each claims to be the only canonical church in the country,…

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Being Accommodationist: What Hauerwas and Willimon Really Mean
Orthodoxy and Modernity, Theology

Being Accommodationist: What Hauerwas and Willimon Really Mean

български | ქართული | ελληνικά | Русский | Српски The term “accommodationist” has recently become a topic of some contention in global Orthodox Christian conversations on human sexuality. The term was derived from the widely influential book by Stanley Hauerwas and William Willimon, Resident Aliens: Life in the Christian Colony (first published in 1989, and…

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After the Yarovaya Laws: The Russian Orthodox Church and the “Traditional Values” International at a Crossroads
Religion and Politics

After the Yarovaya Laws: The Russian Orthodox Church and the “Traditional Values” International at a Crossroads

One of the strangest aspects of Vladimir Putin’s third term as president of the Russian Federation has been the emergence of Russia as the global standard bearer for so-called “traditional values.” Many commentators, pundits, scholars, and Russia watchers have had difficulty coming to terms with this shift. While certain left-wing commentators such as Stephen F….

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Orthodoxy and Modernity

“Re-Christianizing” Russia

Since the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991, the Orthodox Church has aspired to nothing less than “a second Christianization” of the Russian nation—a term that appears in its Missionary Concept of 2007. The Church has striven to revive Russia’s historic Orthodox identity by becoming, with state assistance, a comprehensive presence in society. Critics…

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Public Orthodoxy seeks to promote conversation by providing a forum for diverse perspectives on contemporary issues related to Orthodox Christianity. The positions expressed in the articles on this website are solely the author’s and do not necessarily represent the views of the editors or the Orthodox Christian Studies Center.

Attribution

Public Orthodoxy is a publication of the Orthodox Christian Studies Center of Fordham University