Tag: Archbishop Iakovos

“Full and Understanding Support”: A Response to “The Wrong Side of History”
Public Life

“Full and Understanding Support”: A Response to “The Wrong Side of History”

ελληνικά We are thankful to hear from two distinguished Greek Americans, Dr. Aristotle Papanikolaou and Dr. George Demacopoulos, who recently published an essay about the injustices African Americans face. The authors encourage us to step into their shoes, and we agree that the Greek Orthodox Archdiocese has a role to play in the struggle for…

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Orthodox Christianity, Systemic Racism, and the Wrong Side of History
Orthodoxy and Modernity, Public Life, Uncategorized

Orthodox Christianity, Systemic Racism, and the Wrong Side of History

ελληνικά | Română | ру́сский | српски When Archbishop Iakovos stood alongside Martin Luther King Jr. in Selma in 1965, he was maligned by many Greek Americans who took offense that their Archbishop would “fraternize with Civil Rights agitators.” Fifty-five years later, opinion has shifted dramatically. Iakovos’ march alongside MLK is widely regarded as one of…

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My Silent Church
Religion and Politics

My Silent Church

Above my desk is a sign I bought years ago in an antique shop in the town where my Yiayia Kay grew up. It says, “No Dogs, No Greeks.” I originally bought it with a fair amount of Millennial irony, too gleeful at the fact that it would preside over a room that normally contains…

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Orthodoxy and Race in Light of Trump’s Inauguration
Ethics, Orthodoxy and Modernity

Orthodoxy and Race in Light of Trump’s Inauguration

On March 15, 1965, something momentous occurred. Martin Luther King Jr. marched down the streets of Selma side by side with various important religious and social leaders to memorialize the deaths of two civil rights heroes. With him marched Archbishop Iakovos—the only white bishop who had responded to the call to march. The three marches…

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Martin Luther King, Jr. and the Legacy of the Civil Rights Movement
Ethics, Orthodoxy and Modernity

Martin Luther King, Jr. and the Legacy of the Civil Rights Movement

Martin Luther King, Jr., was born in Atlanta, Georgia in 1929, the son of Alberta Williams King and Martin Luther King, Sr., pastor of Ebenezer Baptist Church. King’s childhood was happy and secure, though all too early he was made aware of the hurts inflicted by racism. Like his father, grandfather, and great-grandfather, he entered the…

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Public Orthodoxy is a publication of the Orthodox Christian Studies Center of Fordham University