Tag: Architecture

Heritage Omitted is Heritage Denied: Recognizing Coptic Palm Sunday Practices
Culture and Arts

Heritage Omitted is Heritage Denied: Recognizing Coptic Palm Sunday Practices

Recognition of the Coptic Palm Sunday practices is crucial for the politics of inclusive heritage globally as much as locally. From the early centuries, for Coptic Christians in Egypt, Palm Sunday has been a day of widespread popular celebrations that far surpasses the religious ceremony associated with the occasion of commemorating the entry of Christ…

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When Putin Takes Revenge on His Own History
Religion and Politics

When Putin Takes Revenge on His Own History

български | ქართული | Русский A Greek version of this text is available at Polymeros kai Polytropos, the blog of the Volos Academy for Theological Studies At the time of writing, the tsar’s fighter jets are pounding the gorgeous Kyiv, and air raid sirens are echoing everywhere. “Who has believed our message” declares the prophet…

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Why Orthodox Art in Eastern Europe Matters
Culture and Arts

Why Orthodox Art in Eastern Europe Matters

The Orthodox art of the predominantly Eastern Christian regions of Eastern Europe has much to offer, yet it has been relegated to the margins of inquiry. Outside of local communities and circles of academic specialists, relatively little is known about the countries, peoples, cultures, and histories of Eastern Europe. This is especially true of the…

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On Throwing Stones in Houses of Glass
Ecclesiology

On Throwing Stones in Houses of Glass Moscow, Constantinople, and Autocephaly

български |  Ελληνικά | Русский  |  Српски Much breath and ink continues to be spent castigating the Patriarchate of Constantinople for its “uncanonical” bestowal of autocephaly upon the Orthodox Church of Ukraine (OCU).  Characteristic are the words of newly-elected Patriarch Porfirije of Serbia: “The actions of Constantinople in Ukraine are not in accordance with the…

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The Meaning of Hagia Sophia: A Traveler’s Perspective
Culture and Arts

The Meaning of Hagia Sophia: A Traveler’s Perspective

The church of Hagia Sophia was the preeminent monument of Christian architecture and an active church for almost a millennium until the conquest of Constantinople in 1453, when the clergy and people were slaughtered as they celebrated their last Liturgy. Hagia Sophia was used as a mosque for Muslim prayers until 1934, when the new…

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Hymn of Entry to the Hagia Sophia
Culture and Arts, Liturgical Life, Theology

Hymn of Entry to the Hagia Sophia

This essay is published here on the occasion of the first prayers following Hagia Sophia’s reversion to a mosque, July 24, 2020. It was spring 1964—a difficult year for the Orthodox Greek brothers of Constantinople, because of the well-known anti-Greek acts of the Turks, due to Cyprus. I was in the Theological Academy of Chalke…

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The Hagia Sophia: A Museum or a Place of Worship?
Culture and Arts, Ecumenical and Interfaith Relations

The Hagia Sophia: A Museum or a Place of Worship?

I categorically refuse to pay an entrance fee for a church, out of principle. When I was in Bratislava, and the Catholic cathedral charged a very small fee, I did not enter. When I returned to the wonderful Cathedral Church in Trogir, Croatia, two years ago, it was selling entrance tickets—so I relied on my…

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“Orthodox Morality” on Sex or an Ethics of Sex? Part Two: A Theology of the Erotic
Bridging Voices Project, Gender and Sexuality, Theology

“Orthodox Morality” on Sex or an Ethics of Sex? Part Two: A Theology of the Erotic

ελληνικά This essay is part of a series stemming from the ongoing research project “Contemporary Eastern Orthodox Identity and the Challenges of Pluralism and Sexual Diversity in a Secular Age,” which is a joint venture by scholars from Fordham University’s Orthodox Christian Studies Center and the University of Exeter, funded by the British Council, Friends…

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The Flame in Our Lady’s Hair
Culture and Arts

The Flame in Our Lady’s Hair

Paris is not merely a place, it is also a “way of life,” said the Athenian theologian and philosopher Christos Yannaras. And the way of life is always the result of how (the manner in which) things exist. At the onset of this millennium, Catherine Dolez, a professor at the Alliance Française, persistently argued that…

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Studying Byzantine Cappadocia
Church History

Studying Byzantine Cappadocia

This past June, I visited Cappadocia in central Turkey. It was my second trip to the region, and it certainly won’t be my last, as I have decided to focus on Cappadocian art history in graduate school. “Why Cappadocia?” I am frequently asked. The best way to answer that question is to start at the…

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Public Orthodoxy seeks to promote conversation by providing a forum for diverse perspectives on contemporary issues related to Orthodox Christianity. The positions expressed in the articles on this website are solely the author’s and do not necessarily represent the views of the editors or the Orthodox Christian Studies Center.

Attribution

Public Orthodoxy is a publication of the Orthodox Christian Studies Center of Fordham University