Tag: Crucifixion

The Origins of Anti-Jewish Rhetoric in the Hymns of Good Friday
Church History, Liturgical Life

The Origins of Anti-Jewish Rhetoric in the Hymns of Good Friday

български | ქართული | ελληνικά | Română | Русский | Српски The oldest-surviving Christian hymns designed exclusively for Holy Week are a set known as the Idiomele.  In the modern Orthodox Church, they are sung during the Royal Hours service of Good Friday morning (the final hymn is sung during two additional services). Apart from their…

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The Worst of All Curses
Religion and Conflict

The Worst of All Curses

български | ქართული | ελληνικά | Română | Русский | Српски One night terror I experienced during my childhood included bombers flying over the roof of our fifteenth-floor apartment in Moscow. No wonder, as every evening the news reported heavily on the enemy’s military build-up. At the time I could not quite understand why such…

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Was Mary, the Mother of Jesus, the First Person to See the Risen Lord Outside the Empty Tomb?
Biblical Studies

Was Mary, the Mother of Jesus, the First Person to See the Risen Lord Outside the Empty Tomb?

In Orthodox icons of Jesus’s empty tomb and resurrection, it is common to see Mary the mother of Jesus depicted as one of the myrrhbearing women. A related theme, although perhaps depicted less frequently in icons, is that the Virgin Mary saw the risen Jesus outside the tomb. Indeed, some Orthodox Christians today insist that…

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The Orthodox Monk-Archaeologist who Discovered a Crucified Man
Biblical Studies

The Orthodox Monk-Archaeologist who Discovered a Crucified Man

As a follow-up to my recent article “Where are the Orthodox Biblical Archaeologists?” it seems timely to present the fascinating story of the single greatest exception to the rule: Vassilios Tzaferis, the Greek Orthodox monk-turned-archaeologist who discovered the material remains of the only crucified man ever found. Tzaferis was born to a rural peasant family…

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Public Orthodoxy is a publication of the Orthodox Christian Studies Center of Fordham University