Tag: Free Will

Between Darwin and Dostoevsky
Religion and Science, Theology

Between Darwin and Dostoevsky Lessons from a Russian Orthodox Scientist, Part 1

When he was young and Russia was in the throes of revolution, Theodosius Dobzhansky (1900-1975) felt the “urgency of finding a meaning of life…in the bloody tumult.” But he was stuck between two poles that drew him equally: religion and science. He loved Darwin and he loved Dostoevsky. “The intellectual stimulation derived from the works…

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What Is a Truly Free Will?
Theology

What Is a Truly Free Will? Part One of an Interim Report on That All Shall Be Saved

I should explain. I am in the process of preparing a kind of “interim report” on my recent book That All Shall Be Saved, in preparation for a number of public events, and perhaps in anticipation of a second edition of the text. And the editors of Public Orthodoxy have kindly offered me a venue in which…

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Lent as Liberation
Theology

Lent as Liberation

How would you describe Orthodox Christianity in one word?” This question was posed to a panel of scholars at a Theology conference several years ago. A few of the panelists gave their answers—offering responses like “Liturgy,” “Authentic,” “Theosis,” and “Traditional.” Then the final panelist, Metropolitan Kallistos Ware, gave his reply: “Freedom,” he said, “Orthodoxy is…

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Is Christian Theology Possible Without the Fall?
Theology

Is Christian Theology Possible Without the Fall?

Over the centuries the notion of a fall of humanity from a state of primeval bliss and communion with God has been, faute de mieux, a convenient theological coat-rack to hang such important Christian doctrines as the origin of evil and death, original sin, human moral weakness, the Incarnation of Christ and baptismal theology. The…

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Public Orthodoxy is a publication of the Orthodox Christian Studies Center of Fordham University