Tag Archives: George Demacopoulos

Introducing the Journal of Orthodox Christian Studies

by George Demacopoulos and Vera Shevzov

The Orthodox Christian Studies Center of Fordham University is pleased to announce the launch of the Journal of Orthodox Christian Studies, the first double-blind peer-reviewed academic journal covering all aspects of Orthodox Christianity and the Orthodox Christian world. The first issue is now available digitally and in print. Subscription information and more details about the journal are available from Johns Hopkins University Press.

The following introductory note by journal editors George Demacopoulos and Vera Shevzov briefly explains the vision and significance of the journal and of the field of Orthodox Christian studies.


Often associated with the qualifier “Eastern” and perceived as the Christian “other” in the context of contemporary world Christianity, Orthodox Christianity has historically remained largely off the curricular and scholarly radars of American academics. Yet, from late antiquity to modern times, as persecuted minorities, subjects of state-supported imperial regimes, or immigrants to “foreign lands,” Orthodox Christians have made some of the most significant and lasting contributions to the visual arts, literature, music, philosophy and theology, among other fields. Equally significant, yet politically more contentious, is the fact that Orthodoxy, in all its distinctive permutations, has historically offered a host of alternatives to the more familiar Western European narratives of the history of Christianity, as well as histories of traditionally Orthodox countries and cultures.

As a field, Orthodox Christian Studies connects an archipelago of cultural and religious traditions that for centuries were the dominant forms of Christianity throughout Asia Minor, the Balkans, Eastern Europe, the Middle East, and Russia. And while there is creative scholarly work devoted to the study of Orthodox Christianity in these regions and elsewhere, most of that work is conducted in relative isolation. Continue Reading…

The Byzantine Origins of Gun Control

by George Demacopoulos

It would be difficult to overstate the significance of the Byzantine emperor Justinian for both Christian and political history because, more than any previous Christian ruler, he integrated Christian precepts into imperial legislation. Whether one looks favorably upon the Byzantine model of Church/State “symphonia” or prefers a Jeffersonian separation of Church and State, every modern formulation of Christianity in politics is, in one way or another, a response to Justinian’s legacy. Even the current debate on gun control was anticipated by a Justinianic law preventing citizens from owning weapons.

Justinian’s Novella 85 strictly forbade the sale of weapons to citizens. Only small knives and domestic axes were exempted from the regulation. The ancient Romans had previously forbidden the possession of weapons by citizens within urban areas, but the preface to Novella 85 highlights an explicitly Christian orientation in the formulation of the new and more comprehensive law. Continue Reading…

It’s Time to Merge St. Vladimir’s and Holy Cross

by George Demacopoulos

It has always been the case that forces beyond the control of the Church have prompted changes in the practice of theological education. For example, Ottoman repression led many Greek Christians to seek education abroad. Tsar Peter I imposed Western-styled seminaries upon the Russian Church. And the Bolshevik Revolution crippled religious education throughout Russia and much of Eastern Europe.

While not as dire as those examples, Orthodox seminaries in the United States face significant structural challenges. At one and the same time, the real cost of operating a seminary is steeply rising while active participation in the Church is diminishing.  What is more, the very nature of seminary education is undergoing a profound change that requires genuine transformation.

When they were founded, St. Vladimir’s Theological Seminary and Holy Cross Greek Orthodox School of Theology functioned as cultural and theological oases, preparing priests for Russian and Greek immigrant communities. Over the past ten years, however, because fewer and fewer young men raised in Church pursue the priesthood, the majority of divinity graduates have been adult converts to Orthodoxy. Continue Reading…

The Benedict of History versus The Benedict Option

by George Demacopoulos

Rod Dreher’s book The Benedict Option has much to commend it. Among other things, it aptly recognizes that the landscape of American religious practice is rapidly changing and in some depressing ways. It affirms that a faith divorced from real-life practice is useless. And it recognizes that Christians benefit when they mine their ancient traditions. Given this last point, it is particularly unfortunate that the presentation of the actual, historical St. Benedict in The Benedict Option is misleading. Continue Reading…