Tag: Martin Luther King

“Full and Understanding Support”: A Response to “The Wrong Side of History”
Public Life

“Full and Understanding Support”: A Response to “The Wrong Side of History”

by Nikolaos Piperis and Stavros Piperis | ελληνικά We are thankful to hear from two distinguished Greek Americans, Dr. Aristotle Papanikolaou and Dr. George Demacopoulos, who recently published an essay about the injustices African Americans face. The authors encourage us to step into their shoes, and we agree that the Greek Orthodox Archdiocese has a…

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COVID-19, the Murder of George Floyd, and Continuing the Lockdown
Liturgical Life, Public Life

COVID-19, the Murder of George Floyd, and Continuing the Lockdown

by Theodore Theophilos | ελληνικά These have been unsettling times. I have been forced by the events of the last several months to face up to several disconcerting truths. When the COVID-19 lockdown orders were issued, they had a common element.  Churches were not deemed “essential.” Liquor stores, pot distributors, and lottery sales were deemed essential. Commercial…

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Racism: An Orthodox Perspective
Uncategorized

Racism: An Orthodox Perspective

The primary goal of the Orthodox Christian is to struggle toward theosis—deification. The word theosis often conjures up images of a super hero like Thor or a Greek god like Zeus. When St. Athanasius proclaimed that “God became human so that humans can become gods,” he was not envisioning super-human strength, nor was he envisioning…

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African American Orthodox Christians
Uncategorized

African American Orthodox Christians

In 2016, I began a series of interviews with African American Orthodox Christians in four regions of the United States.  An integral component of a wider ethnographic research project (one combining participant observation and digital research) personal narratives offer a necessary depth of insight into an Orthodox community which still remains relatively unfamiliar to many….

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My Silent Church
Religion and Politics

My Silent Church

by Katherine Kelaidis Above my desk is a sign I bought years ago in an antique shop in the town where my Yiayia Kay grew up. It says, “No Dogs, No Greeks.” I originally bought it with a fair amount of Millennial irony, too gleeful at the fact that it would preside over a room…

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Martin Luther King, Jr. and the Legacy of the Civil Rights Movement
Ethics, Orthodoxy and Modernity

Martin Luther King, Jr. and the Legacy of the Civil Rights Movement

by Albert J. Raboteau Martin Luther King, Jr., was born in Atlanta, Georgia in 1929, the son of Alberta Williams King and Martin Luther King, Sr., pastor of Ebenezer Baptist Church. King’s childhood was happy and secure, though all too early he was made aware of the hurts inflicted by racism. Like his father, grandfather, and…

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Archbishop Iakovos, Martin Luther King Jr., and The Challenge of Selma
Orthodoxy and Modernity, Public Life

Archbishop Iakovos, Martin Luther King Jr., and The Challenge of Selma

The third Monday in the month of January is set aside by Americans to honor the memory of Martin Luther King, Jr. King’s witness in life and death continues to call society to see every person as created in the image and likeness of God and worthy of equal treatment under the law. One of…

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Public Orthodoxy seeks to promote conversation by providing a forum for diverse perspectives on contemporary issues related to Orthodox Christianity. The positions expressed in the articles on this website are solely the author’s and do not necessarily represent the views of the editors or the Orthodox Christian Studies Center.

Attribution

Public Orthodoxy is a publication of the Orthodox Christian Studies Center of Fordham University