Tag: Russian Orthodox Church

Ethnoreligiosic Rose of the Kremlin
Religion and Politics

Ethnoreligiosic Rose of the Kremlin A Harbinger of Intellectual and Moral Decay

The aggression by Putin’s regime towards Ukraine, coupled with the religious dimension from the Russian Orthodox Church, has been thoroughly explored, offering diverse interpretations of varying quality. Regardless, these explorations undeniably prompt a reevaluation of political and religious alliances in today’s sociopolitical framework, modernizing the approach to the issue primarily rooted in medieval forms of…

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Are Nuclear Weapons Moral?
Ethics, Religion and Conflict

Are Nuclear Weapons Moral? In Search of Orthodox Christian Thought on Deterrence and Disarmament

I happened to be in Sweden when the country joined NATO two months ago. On March 6, an American nuclear-capable B-52 strategic bomber overflew the capital region in a show of solidarity with the newest alliance member. On the ground below, in the Stockholm suburbs, I was beginning my field work with Orthodox Christians to…

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The Moscow Patriarchate and the “Struggle for War”
Religion and Conflict

The Moscow Patriarchate and the “Struggle for War”

On March 27, 2024, an extraordinary session of the World Russian People’s Council (WRPC) was held in Moscow. Patriarch Kirill personally presided over the congress. The main event of the Congress was the approval of the Edict (in Russian: Nakaz) of the XXV World Russian People’s Council, “The Present and Future of the Russian World.”…

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When Theology Fuels the War
Religion and Conflict

When Theology Fuels the War False Prophecy and State Policy in “The Present and Future of the Russian World” Document

On March 27, the World Russian People’s Council (WRPC), headed by Patriarch Kirill (Gundiaev), met at the Cathedral of Christ the Savior in Moscow to ratify its programmatic document, “The Present and Future of the Russian World.” The document opens with a section on the Russian war in Ukraine, followed by a section on the…

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Letter to Russia: The Importance of Finding Those Who Are United in Spirit
Church Life and Pastoral Care, Religion and Conflict

Letter to Russia: The Importance of Finding Those Who Are United in Spirit

Editor’s Note: The Orthodox Church in Russia is divided, but this division is not canonical nor administrative. Moreover, it is not always visible from the outside. While the official Church has become an integral part of Putin’s political regime, on a deeper level, there is resistance on behalf of small Orthodox communities and individuals who…

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Bishops’ Conference – The Major Outcome: Resentment against the Ecumenical Patriarchate
Inter-Orthodox Relations

Bishops’ Conference – The Major Outcome: Resentment against the Ecumenical Patriarchate

What problems are of concern to Patriarch Kirill and the bishops of the Russian Orthodox Church? This question, in particular, is answered by the documents of the Bishops’ Councils of the Russian Orthodox Church, one of the highest authorities of Church governance. However, the difficulty is that Patriarch Kirill has been unable to convene another…

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The Spirit of Christian Freedom
Public Life

The Spirit of Christian Freedom Remembering Archbishop Artemy

The spirit of Christian freedom is a gift that in post-Soviet Orthodoxy has not, alas, been embraced or appreciated by many. Soviet-educated people, deprived of their experience of inner freedom, mostly failed to discover Orthodoxy as a liberating experience. Rather the opposite, immersion in church life became a convenient substitute for Soviet ideology. The path…

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Russia, Ukraine, and the Orthodox Church: The Aftermath?
Religion and Conflict

Russia, Ukraine, and the Orthodox Church: The Aftermath?

As the war between Russia and Ukraine enters its second year, prayers throughout the world continue to be offered for a quick and just end. One question that needs to be raised is what will this just end look like? Regardless of who the victor will be, regardless of whether the political players—Putin and Zelensky—will…

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The Tower of Babel and Sobornost
Religion and Politics, Theology

The Tower of Babel and Sobornost Unity in Multiplicity

In an interview reported by The Russian Orthodox Church Department for External Church Relations, Rossiya TV asked Patriarch Kirill about his visit to Latin America in February 2016. At the time, Kirill commented about his impression of South America and his hopes for that country. As a comparative lesson, he reflected on the experience of…

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Ukrainian Autocephaly and Responsibility toward the Faithful
Inter-Orthodox Relations

Ukrainian Autocephaly and Responsibility toward the Faithful

The following are excerpts from the intervention of His Eminence Metropolitan Ignatius of Demetrias, Chairman of the Synodal Committee for Inter-Orthodox and Inter-Christian Relations, during the Extraordinary Session of the Holy Synod of the Church of Greece (12th October 2019). The Synodal Committee for Inter-Orthodox and Inter-Christian Relations, which I am honored to chair, explicitly…

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The Complexity and Duplicity of Deciphering the New Ukrainian Law on Religion
Religion and Politics

The Complexity and Duplicity of Deciphering the New Ukrainian Law on Religion

The problem of conversions between religious communities has existed in Ukraine  since the late 1980s and early 1990s,  when the country was struggling for independence and its religious map was being formed. The rise from the underground of the Ukrainian Greco-Catholic Church (UGCC) raised questions about the restitution of property lost as a result of…

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The Russian Church: Profiting by Silence
Religion and Politics

The Russian Church: Profiting by Silence

Last Sunday Russia saw a wave of protests against corruption in the upper echelons of power. Masses took to the streets ignited by the investigation of the Anti-Corruption Foundation titled “He is Not Dimon for You,” which focused on the alleged corrupt affairs of Russian Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev. The outcome of these events surprised…

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Is the Russian Orthodox Church Pushing Battered Women into Feminism?
Religion and Politics, Women in the Church

Is the Russian Orthodox Church Pushing Battered Women into Feminism?

As expected, President Putin signed the law decriminalizing family violence, shifting certain offenses from criminal to administrative proceedings. Ostensibly this was done to bring the law into compliance with changes to the criminal code that had redefined assaults that do not result in “substantial bodily harm” from criminal to administrative violations. The change was decried…

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“Beat Her When You Are Alone Together”
Religion and Politics

“Beat Her When You Are Alone Together” Domestic Violence in the Russian Tradition, Past and Present

On February 7, Russian President Vladimir Putin signed a law decriminalizing domestic violence. Now, the first instance of poboi—“actions which cause physical pain but do not lead to grave injury or loss of ability to work’’—will be treated as a misdemeanor rather than a criminal act. This means that the offender will incur a fine…

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Orthodoxy and Modernity

“Re-Christianizing” Russia

Since the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991, the Orthodox Church has aspired to nothing less than “a second Christianization” of the Russian nation—a term that appears in its Missionary Concept of 2007. The Church has striven to revive Russia’s historic Orthodox identity by becoming, with state assistance, a comprehensive presence in society. Critics…

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Disclaimer

Public Orthodoxy seeks to promote conversation by providing a forum for diverse perspectives on contemporary issues related to Orthodox Christianity. The positions expressed in the articles on this website are solely the author’s and do not necessarily represent the views of the editors or the Orthodox Christian Studies Center.

Attribution

Public Orthodoxy is a publication of the Orthodox Christian Studies Center of Fordham University