Tag: Secularization

Yoga and Orthodoxy
Church Life and Pastoral Care, Orthodoxy and Modernity, Theology

Yoga and Orthodoxy

ελληνικά | Română | српски In the wake of advice disseminated earlier this month across a variety of Greek media channels that the practice of yoga can be helpful to manage anxiety provoked by COVID-19, the Holy Synod of the Church of Greece felt compelled to make an official declaration that the practice of yoga…

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The Flame in Our Lady’s Hair
Culture and Arts

The Flame in Our Lady’s Hair

Paris is not merely a place, it is also a “way of life,” said the Athenian theologian and philosopher Christos Yannaras. And the way of life is always the result of how (the manner in which) things exist. At the onset of this millennium, Catherine Dolez, a professor at the Alliance Française, persistently argued that…

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Secularization, Multiple Modernities, and the Contemporary Challenge of “Multiple Orthodoxies”
Bridging Voices Project, Orthodoxy and Modernity

Secularization, Multiple Modernities, and the Contemporary Challenge of “Multiple Orthodoxies”

“Have you secularized?” – That was the question that I was asked, regularly and over the course of many years, by friends and colleagues every time I was travelling back in Romania from the UK. It became such a refrain of my hometown visits that at some point it turned into a sort of running…

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The Greek Orthodox Church Meets Secularization
Orthodoxy and Modernity, Public Life

The Greek Orthodox Church Meets Secularization

Since the establishment of the Modern Greek state (1830), the Greek Orthodox Church has functioned more or less as one of the (perhaps the most important) institutions of the state and continues to enjoy certain symbolic and other privileges (“prevailing religion”) granted by the Constitution. The progressively-closer dependence of the Church on the state, especially…

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Public Orthodoxy seeks to promote conversation by providing a forum for diverse perspectives on contemporary issues related to Orthodox Christianity. The positions expressed in the articles on this website are solely the author’s and do not necessarily represent the views of the editors or the Orthodox Christian Studies Center.

Attribution

Public Orthodoxy is a publication of the Orthodox Christian Studies Center of Fordham University