Tag: Theosis

From Altar Calls to Theosis
Church Life and Pastoral Care, Ecumenical and Interfaith Relations, Theology

From Altar Calls to Theosis What Orthodoxy Showed Me about a Life of Transformation

  I did not grow up in a church that observed Lent, but I did grow up around altar calls. For me and my community, these deeply emotional and cathartic encounters at church were often the catalysts for the spiritual transformations I longed for in my youth. And while I’m not entirely against altar calls…

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“Orthodox Morality” on Sex or an Ethics of Sex? Part Two: A Theology of the Erotic
Bridging Voices Project, Gender and Sexuality, Theology

“Orthodox Morality” on Sex or an Ethics of Sex? Part Two: A Theology of the Erotic

ελληνικά This essay is part of a series stemming from the ongoing research project “Contemporary Eastern Orthodox Identity and the Challenges of Pluralism and Sexual Diversity in a Secular Age,” which is a joint venture by scholars from Fordham University’s Orthodox Christian Studies Center and the University of Exeter, funded by the British Council, Friends…

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Racism: An Orthodox Perspective
Uncategorized

Racism: An Orthodox Perspective

The primary goal of the Orthodox Christian is to struggle toward theosis—deification. The word theosis often conjures up images of a super hero like Thor or a Greek god like Zeus. When St. Athanasius proclaimed that “God became human so that humans can become gods,” he was not envisioning super-human strength, nor was he envisioning…

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Orthodoxy and Modernity, Theology

Political Nestorianism and the Politics of Theosis

This essay was originally delivered as a public talk at the June 2015 Fordham/OTSA conference on the upcoming Great and Holy Council of the Orthodox Church. It was part of a panel on “The Contribution of the Orthodox Church to the Realization of Justice, Freedom, Brotherhood, and Love among Peoples.” In addressing how the Orthodox…

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Public Orthodoxy seeks to promote conversation by providing a forum for diverse perspectives on contemporary issues related to Orthodox Christianity. The positions expressed in the articles on this website are solely the author’s and do not necessarily represent the views of the editors or the Orthodox Christian Studies Center.

Attribution

Public Orthodoxy is a publication of the Orthodox Christian Studies Center of Fordham University