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LGBTQ+ and Orthodox Tradition What Does It Actually Say?

  • Dr. Susan Ashbrook Harvey

    Willard Prescott and Annie McClelland Professor of History and Religion at Brown University

  • Perry Hamalis

    Cecelia Schneller Mueller Professor of Religion at North Central College, Naperville, IL

  • Nina Glibetić

    Assistant Professor of Liturgical Studies at the University of Notre Dame

Published on: October 20, 2023
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First panel session from the event “Seeking Harmony and Compassion: Pastoral Care and LGBTQ+ Orthodox Faithful,” held at Fordham University’s Lincoln Center Campus October 13, 2023.

Panelists include Dr. Susan Ashbrook Harvey, Fr. Perry Hamalis, and Dr. Nina Glibetic. Opening introduction by Elena Paraskevas-Thadani. As Orthodox Christians, we are called, first and foremost, to love all—for “God is love.” But the reality for many lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer Orthodox Christians today is that their relationship to the Church is defined not by love, but by apathy, exclusion, and condemnation. We must, as a faith, choose love and compassion—to “love thy neighbor”— instead. This requires no change of faith, but a fuller, more compassionate understanding of what our faith in loving God truly requires of us.

The Church is at a crossroads. We offer this symposium in love and faith, praying that the road we choose is the right one—the one that leads to God.

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Public Orthodoxy seeks to promote conversation by providing a forum for diverse perspectives on contemporary issues related to Orthodox Christianity. The positions expressed in this essay are solely the author’s and do not necessarily represent the views of the editors or the Orthodox Christian Studies Center.

About authors

  • Dr. Susan Ashbrook Harvey

    Dr. Susan Ashbrook Harvey

    Willard Prescott and Annie McClelland Professor of History and Religion at Brown University

    Susan Ashbrook Harvey is Willard Prescott and Annie McClelland Professor of History and Religion at Brown University. She specializes in late antique and Byzantine Christianity, with Syriac studies as her particular focus. She has published widely on topics relating to asceticism, hagiography, women...

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  • Perry Hamalis

    Perry Hamalis

    Cecelia Schneller Mueller Professor of Religion at North Central College, Naperville, IL

    Rev. Dr. Perry Hamalis is Cecelia Schneller Mueller Professor of Religion at North Central College (Naperville, IL). In 2015-16, he was a Fulbright Senior Fellow and Underwood Visiting Professor at Yonsei University (Seoul). A deacon of the Orthodox Metropolis of Korea, he teaches, writes, and lectu...

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  • Nina Glibetić

    Nina Glibetić

    Assistant Professor of Liturgical Studies at the University of Notre Dame

    Nina Glibetić teaches in the field of liturgical studies at the University of Notre Dame. Her research is interdisciplinary, drawing principally from liturgiology, medieval history, ritual studies, and Byzantine and Slavic studies. She has received several fellowships, including at the Institute for...

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Public Orthodoxy seeks to promote conversation by providing a forum for diverse perspectives on contemporary issues related to Orthodox Christianity. The positions expressed in the articles on this website are solely the author’s and do not necessarily represent the views of the editors or the Orthodox Christian Studies Center.

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Public Orthodoxy is a publication of the Orthodox Christian Studies Center of Fordham University